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Working in Bereavement and Loss

A wide range of professionals and volunteers provide support to people who are bereaved. It is important for people working in bereavement and loss to be aware of the limits of their own competence, to avail of appropriate training, and to be aware of national supports.
As a rule, the more complex a bereaved person’s needs, the more advanced skill and training is required by a helper.

 

Updated 09/12/2016

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National Networks and Policies

National networks and policies help those working in bereavement and loss to standardise and optimise the care they provide to grieving people. Ireland does not have a national strategy for end-of-life or bereavement care. However, a number of national networks have developed among organisations focusing on bereavement related issues.   National networks The Irish Childhood […] Read more >

Bereavement Training and Education

Understanding grief is a core competence for all those working in health professions. To this end, the Irish Hospice Foundation offers bereavement education and training at multiple levels. Training ranges from introductory e-learning (for all), to workshops on specific topics for people whose work/volunteering brings them into regular contact with bereaved people. In addition, postgraduate courses, such […] Read more >

Grief in the Workplace

Grief cannot be left at the door when an employee comes to work. Many managers and colleagues want to do the right thing but are unsure about how to support a bereaved colleague. To address this, the Irish Hospice Foundation has created a series of resources and training programmes for organisations and staff to help them understand grief in […] Read more >

Complicated Grief

What is Complicated Grief? For a small number of people, the reduction in their feeling of grief over time of does not happen. Their grief becomes stuck and they experience disabling and persistent symptoms that don’t improve. Strong feelings of yearning and distress continue to be experienced, often coupled with feelings of anger, guilt, bitterness, […] Read more >

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