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Posts Tagged ‘Bereavement’

Dying is Everyone’s Business. Can we afford to forget Grief? IHF Pre Budget Submission

Posted on: July 6th, 2017

Irish Hospice Foundation Pre Budget Submission calls for a national strategy for palliative, end of life bereavement care

  • 300,000 newly bereaved every year
  • IHF pre-budget submission calls for change
Irish Hospice Foundation Pre-Budget Submission 2018 L-R Orla Keegan, Head of Education, Research & Bereavement, Marie Lynch, Head of Healthcare Programmes and Angela Edghill, Advocacy & Public Engagement Manager

Pictured at the Irish Hospice Foundation Pre-Budget Submission 2018 L-R Orla Keegan, Head of Education, Research & Bereavement, Marie Lynch, Head of Healthcare Programmes and Angela Edghill, Advocacy & Public Engagement Manager.
Photo By Paul Sherwood

Today (Thursday July 6th)  the Irish Hospice Foundation (IHF) calls for the government to show that bereavement, palliative care, end-of life issues are priority areas for policy development and investment. At their Pre-Budget Briefing in Dublin today the IHF strongly advocates for the development of a national strategy on palliative care, end of life and bereavement to include both health and non-health areas of public policy. This underpins all 23 IHF recommendations for budget 2018. Death is an inevitable and universal experience – a fact of life. While most people will experience ‘death denial’, it is not appropriate that the State adopt the same attitude. Dying, death and bereavement present myriad challenges to the health service and to other state services. That means that a whole society approach is essential. We believe dying, death and bereavement are everyone’s business with the assumption that healthcare and other services will recognise and address our needs. The recent Sláintecare report is an important development outlining a ten year plan for radical reform of Ireland’s health system. Despite its comprehensive look at the health services, sadly bereavement was forgotten in the report. Is no-one grieving in Ireland? The facts differ. In the next 10 years[1]: Almost 300,000 people will die in Ireland Over 3,000 of those deaths will be of children Over 240,000 will be of people over 65 years of age Almost 3 million people will be bereaved[2] and up to 150,000 of these will encounter significant difficulties or ‘complicated grief’[3] Grief is the common ground on which we all stand. We urge the Government and all Oireachtas members to ensure bereavement issues are priority areas for policy development and investment. If current trends continue 5% of grieving people will require specialist mental health services/psychological intervention[4]. Given this evidence, it is essential that the healthcare system meets the needs of people facing dying, death and bereavement and ensures that everyone gets equal access to good care. By careful planning, we can make the best use of the substantial funds that we directly and indirectly invest in the care of the dying and the bereaved, and, crucially, that this planning includes helping people to live well until they die. Orla Keegan Head of Education, Research & Bereavement, IHF said: “The implications of bereavement stretch across our society – all ages, all circumstances, all cultures. The cost of building caring communities is a small investment for long-term gains. Amongst the calls being made by the Irish Hospice Foundation is one for research to uncover the financial impact of loss which will help to reframe the bereavement grant for future generations. Support for joint-working by the voluntary sector in children’s and adult bereavement care is also identified as a primary need.”

Everyone deserves the right to a good death

“Everyone in Ireland deserves to have a good death. For this to happen, improvements are needed in Primary Care, Residential Care and in Hospital settings. These improvements need to specifically focus resources and expertise available outside traditional working hours as well as the development of Specialist Palliative Care in the Midlands and North East. From a public health perspective, the IHF recommend that the Assisted Decision Making (Capacity) Act 2015 is fully commenced this year. In the meantime there is an urgency to invest resources to ensure that Irish citizens and healthcare staff are aware of and fully understand the implications of this Act, particularly the impact on advance healthcare planning and facilitating people to make choices about their own healthcare” stresses Marie Lynch, Head of Healthcare Programmes, the Irish Hospice Foundation.  

Call for delivery of the best palliative, end of life and bereavement care in all care settings

The IHF asks the Government to: Ensure everyone has access to the best care at end of life and in bereavement through a political and public policy commitment to a strategic, responsive, population-wide approach to end of life issues and ensure the health care system delivers best palliative, end of life and bereavement care in all care settings. The IHF believes that with a more strategic approach, better end-of-life care can make a real difference to both the quality of healthcare provided to the citizen and the cost of health and social care to the State – a view supported by an Oireachtas Committee in 2014. [5]
  • According to Angela Edghill, Advoacy and Public Engagement Manager said “such a strategy supports: Government policy set out in the 2016 Programme for a Partnership Government[6] which seeks to ensure that we have an Ireland that looks after its people from the time they come into the world to the time they leave and promises investment in end-of-life care at all life stages. This proposed integrated approach echoes that set out in the National Positive Ageing Strategy[7] and most recently by the Finite Lives Reports[8] [9].
  • Delivery of the targets set out in the Sláintecare Report[10] of the Oireachtas Committee on the Future of Healthcare 2017 which builds on the 2001 National Strategy on Palliative Care (NACPC, 2001[11]) and the new framework for palliative care services, publication of which is expected.
In some cases the challenge is to simply join the dots – to enable, encourage, mainstream and replicate good practice and innovation across the whole of government and community areas.” Recommendations in the IHF pre-budget submission relate in particular the Departments of Health, Social Protection, Education and Skills, Finance, Public Expenditure and Reform, Children and Youth Affairs, Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation and An Taoiseach, but are relevant across the whole range of Government Departments and Agencies. READ FULL PRESS RELEASE AND REFERENCES HERE>>>  

A full copy of the IHF Pre-budget submission is available HERE

For further information please contact: Angela Edghill, Advocacy and Public Engagement Manager      

Plans to form North Dublin network to support bereaved children

Posted on: April 17th, 2015
Temple Street Children’s University Hospital, Beaumont Hospital and St Francis’ Hospice, with The Irish Childhood Bereavement Network (ICBN), are looking to form a regional network to support bereaved children in the North Dublin region.   The ICBN will host a meeting on the topic of ‘supporting children through grief’ on April 23rd in St Francis Hospice, Raheny between 9.30am and 1pm.   The event is open to all professionals in the North Dublin region who come in contact with bereaved children, including youth workers, teachers, nurses, social workers and counsellors.   The meeting is free to attend and will provide an opportunity for attendees to network with each other and discuss the challenges in addressing the needs of bereaved children and how a regional network could help serve bereaved children in the area.   At the meeting the Chair of the ICBN, Brid Carroll, will provide an insight into how children grieve and how best to support them through their loss.   Anne Marie Jones, Principal Medical Social Worker at Temple Street Children’s Hospital will introduce the Irish Childhood Bereavement Care Pyramid, a resource for those concerned with identifying and responding to the needs of a child who is bereaved.   The Pyramid was developed by the ICBN and it is the first time in Ireland that complex information regarding a grieving child has been brought together in a user friendly way. It was launched by Minister James Reilly in 2014.   The ICBN is a hub for those working with bereaved children, young people and their families in Ireland. It is funded by Tusla, the Child and family Centre and The Irish Hospice Foundation.   To attend you must RSVP to [email protected]. There is no charge for the event.   For more information on ICBN see www.childhoodbereavement.ie

IHF welcomes Dáil Committee report calling for development of national end of life strategy

Posted on: July 15th, 2014

The Irish Hospice Foundation, (IHF), today welcomed the report from the Dail Committee on Health and Children calling for the development of a national strategy on palliative care, end of life and bereavement.

 

Chief Executive Officer of the IHF, Sharon Foley, said she hoped the government will act on the findings of the report and put palliative and end of life care at the top of health and other policy agendas. She commended the Dail Committee chairman, Jerry Buttimer TD, and members for the hearings saying “a great service” had been done for the country.

 

Ms Foley said on average 29,000 people die in Ireland each year and as many as 290,000 are left bereaved annually.  Using international research, there is an estimated €1.3 billion being spent on end of life care every year, but this spend is largely unplanned and uncoordinated.

 

“We passionately believe that much more can be done to support the health and social services to deliver better end of life care everywhere and this report is a major step in this direction.”

 

“It is the right of every person to die in comfort and dignity but this is something we must plan for. It is possible to secure high quality care for those facing death while also ensuring the very best use of resources. A national strategy on palliative care, end of life and bereavement, as recommended in todays report, will play a key role in ensuring this.”

 

Ms Foley said this strategy must be for the entire population – from those who need GP support to those who need special palliative care to manage their pain and other complex symptoms and to those left behind and facing grief. The strategy, she stressed, needs to be relevant to patients of all ages with all conditions including dementia.

 

“It also needs to be wider than healthcare. It needs to look at the economic, administrative and legal issues including the funeral industry and bereavement.”

 

Ms Foley also welcomed the committee recommendation that the Government address the regional disparities which exist in the provision and funding of specialist palliative care services in Ireland.

 

“As many as 2,500 patients have no access to in-patient hospice care in their area as they don’t exist. We have three regions in Ireland with no in patient hospice units – the north east, the midlands and the south east, as well as Kerry, Wicklow and Mayo.  Citizens are living and dying with an inequitable system. We have approximately 150 hospice beds today but we should have 450 and we also have significant deficits in hospice staff. “

 

Ms Foley said more need to be done to help people fulfil their wish to die at home. Figures show that while 67 per cent of us would prefer to die at home only 26 per cent of us will do so while another 25 per cent will die in long stay settings. “Lots of good work is being done through the IHF Primary Palliative Care programme, the Hospice home care teams and national hospice homecare for children programme.  In the latter, we we are funding 85% of the programme which is supporting families to care for children, with life limiting illness, at home.”

 

“This report, along with the recent report by the Ombudsman on end of life, will make a serious contribution to the national conversation on death and dying and bereavement and I warmly welcome it.”

 

Note: Link to Oireachtas Committee report on End of Life launched today http://www.oireachtas.ie/parliament/oireachtasbusiness/committees_list/health-and-children/reports/

 

‘Way to go’ documentary asks how well we cope with death

Posted on: June 30th, 2014

A new documentary 'Way to go; death and the Irish' to be broadcast on RTE 1 at 9.35pm on Tuesday July 1st will examine how well we deal with death. 

 The documentary is presented by Norah Casey, Norah's husband Richard died in 2011. It features interviews with well known personalities, healthcare professionals and members of the public who reflect on their personal experiences of bereavement and on attitudes to death and dying.   

Information And  Support  

If you have been bereaved or you have been affected by any of the issues addressed in the programme below are links to advice and support information.

You can also call us on (01) 6793188  if you would like to talk to someone. 

 

     

Irish Hospice Foundation extends condolences to family of Nicky McFadden, TD

Posted on: March 26th, 2014

The Irish Hospice Foundation extends condolences to the family, friends and colleagues of Nicky McFadden, TD.  

Fine Gael TD for Longford Westmeath died yesterday after a battle with Motor Neurone disease.  

The Irish Hospice Foundation benefited from her support for the hospice cause and in particular for sunflower day, which raises funds for local hospice. 

May she Rest in Peace 

LAUNCH OF WEBSITE FOR PROFESSIONALS SUPPORTING GRIEVING CHILDREN

Posted on: December 9th, 2013

The Irish Childhood Bereavement Network (ICBN) has today (9th December) launched its new website www.childhoodbereavement.ie which has valuable information for professionals who are supporting grieving children and young people. 

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Supporting bereaved children 

The website was launched at a regional meeting at Milford Care Centre in Limerick where  over 20 professionals including social workers, palliative care staff, bereavement counsellors and clinical psychologists from Galway, Clare, Limerick, Cork, Kerry and Mayo  attended a networking and training event organised by the ICBN. 

Read More >>>

Living with Loss – Four people talk about their bereavement

Posted on: June 18th, 2013

Coping with loss can be different for everyone. In this short video by the Irish Hospice Foundation four people share their personal experiences of loss. 

You can view additional Irish Hospice Foundation videos HERE 

‘Living with loss’ information evening & talk by Dr Tony Bates

Posted on: October 5th, 2012

Living with loss

November is traditionally a month for remembrance.  As part of our bereavement support function at the Irish Hospice Foundation we will host a bereavement public information evening ‘Living with Loss’ on Thursday November 1st in the Alexander Hotel, Fenian st from 5.30 until 8.30. 

This 'drop in' evening will feature;  

  • Professor Tom Inglis reading from his new book written after the death of his wife Aileen 
  • Video presentations and general information on bereavement 
  • An address by Dr Tony Bates at 6.30 on the theme of 'Living with loss

This event aims to provide information about grief and the range of supports available to bereaved people. There will be an opportunity to talk to voluntary bereavement support services about the supports they provide.

Bereavement Support Services represented include;

  • A Little Lifetime Foundation
  • Anam Cara Parental & Sibling Bereavement Support
  • Barnardos Bereavement Counselling for Children
  • Bereavement Counselling Service
  • Bethany Bereavement Support Group
  • Console
  • Health Service Executive
  • Living Links
  • Rainbows Ireland
  • Turas le Cheile Bereavement Support
  • Turning Point

 This is a free public event and booking is not neccessary,  If you have queries or would like further information please contact; Iris Murray, Irish Hospice Foundation, Morrison Chambers, 4th Floor, 32 Nassau Street, Dublin 2 Tel: 01 679 3188 Fax: 01 673 0040

 

Minister Fitzgerald Launches Irish Childhood Bereavement Network

Posted on: July 23rd, 2012

The Minister for Children and Youth Afairs, Frances Fitzgerald has today launched the Irish Childhood Bereavement Network.

The network aims to act as a hub for professionals and organisations working to support bereaved children and young people and hopes to  facilitate access to a choice of high quality local and national information, guidance and support to enable children to manage the impact of death and the loss in their lives.

Read More

 

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