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Living with Loss 2019

Posted on: October 1st, 2019

The Irish Hospice Foundation will host two ‘Living with Loss’ public information evenings on bereavement in November.
Our annual Living with Loss Dublin event will be held on Thursday, 7th November 2019 at The Alex Hotel.  This year’s guest speaker is writer Emma Hayes. For more information go here. 
On November 14, we will host our first ever Living with Loss Galway event. Author, journalist and radio presenter Meghann Scully will speak about the deaths of her father and brother and her own journey through loss and grief. More details here. 
Both events are free to the public. No booking required. 

Vacancy: Development Officer (Healthcare)

Posted on: September 23rd, 2019

Time for a change? We are looking to fill the role of:

DEVELOPMENT OFFICER (HEALTHCARE)

 

For more information, please contact Deirdre Shanagher Deirdre.shanagher@hospicefoundation.ie
Closing date is Friday 18 October. 

David McWilliams for IHF Never Forgotten Lunch

Posted on: September 11th, 2019
We are delighted to announce that David McWilliams is our very special guest speaker at our annual Never Forgotten Lunch.  Join us, and him,  for a 3 course lunch, with drinks reception and entertainment at Dublin’s Intercontinental Hotel on Thursday 28th November. 

Tables of 10 are €1500 and other numbers can be easily accommodated.  Call us on 01 679 3188 to book your table or pay via our donation page here

FORUM 2019: FULLY BOOKED

Posted on: September 9th, 2019

THIS EVENT IS FULLY BOOKED NOW.
PLEASE FILL IN THE FORM BELOW IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO JOIN OUR WAITING LIST IN THE EVENT OF ANY CANCELLATIONS:

Forum 2019 Waiting List


Tickets for our major conference on dying, death and bereavement FORUM 2019 are selling fast. It takes place on Thursday 24 October in Dublin Castle.
As with previous Forum Gatherings, tickets are expected to sell out in advance of the event, so please book as soon as you can.
For more details & how to book, please go here.
This year’s theme is “Dying is everyone’s business” and we are thrilled Dr. Kathryn Mannix, author of the best-selling book “With the End in Mind” will give our keynote address. 
There will be an exciting panel discussion, questions and answers from the audience, as well as workshops which will include developments in bereavement, exploring the key questions for healthcare arising from the Assisted Decision Making Capacity Act 2015 (ADMA), funerals past and present, nursing home issues and the ever popular (and newly-named) Café Conversation, Bás, Cáca agus Cupán Tae – (Death, cake and a cup of tea) – and much more!
We very much look forward to welcoming you to FORUM 2019.

Will you host a Big Rugby Brunch during the World Cup?

Posted on: August 16th, 2019

Answer our call!

Join in the excitement kicking off in Japan during the World Cup (Sept 20th – Nov 2nd) by hosting a Big Rugby Brunch for The Irish Hospice Foundation.

The matches will be shown during the mornings, so why not organise a brunch for family, friends and colleagues either at home, at your local club or even at work?

Simply ask your brunch guests to give a donation in lieu of a cuppa and a bite to eat.

To join the scrum and raise money for those facing dying, death and bereavement in Ireland, go here. We’ll send you out your very own Big Rugby Brunch Fundraising Pack!

Rosabel’s Rooms- In partnership with the Irish Hospice Foundation

Posted on: June 8th, 2019

 

 

 

 

 

Rosabel’s Rooms was established by parents Suzanne McClean and Gary Monroe in memory of their beloved daughter Rosabel Monroe, who died suddenly and unexpectedly in April 2017, aged sixteen months.

Rosabel’s Rooms in collaboration with The Irish Hospice Foundation, was launched on the 5th January 2018, on what would have been Rosabel’s 2nd birthday.
The project is developing the following activities:
  1. Through the Design & Dignity Programme at the Irish Hospice Foundation, this project is facilitating the development of family-friendly bereavement suites in hospital emergency departments around Ireland, which will provide comfort and dignity for families following the loss of a loved one.
  1. The Rosabel’s Room-to-Heal fund is providing direct financial support to families, when a child dies in Ireland. The Fund is helping bereaved parents and families to take time off work, pay for funeral costs etc.
  1. Over the coming paths, this project will work to ensure required therapeutic supports are made available for individuals impacted by child loss.
Sharon Foley CEO of the IHF says: “We hope this partnership with Rosabel’s Rooms will give families sanctuary to be together in private at extremely difficult times. The essence of Design & Dignity is to convey a sense of reverence and respect for life, death and bereavement.”
For more information, email: rosabelsrooms@gmail.com or click here
For upcoming events, click here  To donate to Rosabel’s Rooms, click here

Rosabel’s Room-to-Heal Fund: Apply now

Rosabel’s Room-to-Heal Fund is providing financial support as an immediate response to the loss of a child. Click here for more information and eligibility. 
Design & Dignity is part of the Hospice Friendly Hospitals (HFH) Programme is an IHF initiative to ensure that palliative, end of life and bereavement care are central to the everyday business of hospitals. To date, the Design and Dignity Project has supported 34 projects around Ireland enabling hospitals to create relaxing spacious family rooms, inpatient suites and maternity bereavement suites and upgraded mortuaries into welcoming, respectful environments. For more information, click here
CHY 6830 – Registered Charity 20013554

Support our Summer Raffle 2019 and help more people die at home

Posted on: March 25th, 2019

The Irish Premiere of ‘A Love That Never Dies’

Posted on: February 1st, 2019
 
Parental bereavement is different to other types of loss in its intensity and level of distress. As a way of raising awareness of parental bereavement in Ireland and encouraging conversation and support, the Irish Hospice Foundation (IHF) is hosting the Irish premiere of the documentary, A Love that Never Dies, in Dublin on Thursday 4 April.
The film is by parents Jane Harris and Jimmy Edmonds, who founded The Good Grief Project, following the death of their son Josh in a road accident in Vietnam in 2011. Jane is a psychotherapist and Jimmy is a BAFTA award winning film maker, together they made A Love That Never Dies as a way of honouring their son’s memory.
The documentary follows them as they set off from the UK on their own road trip across the USA to find out why, in a world where death always makes front page news, real-life conversations about death, dying and bereavement are so problematic. Over a three month period, they met and filmed 13 families all of whom shared remarkable stories of living beyond the death of their own child.
Jane and Jimmy will attend the Dublin premiere on Thursday 4 April at the ODEON Point Square, Point Village.
Speaking ahead of the event, Jane says: “In making our film, our first and last impulse was to gather stories that would produce a documentary in which we could represent a version of what it means to grieve. These are personal stories that, collected together into one narrative, we hope provide insight to the fears and hopes of all bereaved parents (at least those in the western world).”
“This is important, both to substantiate the experience of people traumatised by the death of their child and also to help people who care for the bereaved either as professionals or as friends.”
The free screening is open to the general public and organisations/people that provide support to bereaved parents across Ireland. It will be followed by a Q&A with the filmmakers and representatives from Irish bereavement support organisations.
Head of Education & Bereavement at the IHF is Orla Keegan: “We are delighted and proud to host this film premiere; through its beautiful journey it gives some insight into what for most of us is an unimaginable loss. We invite bereaved parents who may have lost a child of any age to attend. We also hope however that this film gives neighbours, friends and all of us the permission to continue talking with families about a child who has died – their memory lasts and love never dies”.
Refreshments will be available in the iSense Lounge in the ODEON Point Square after the Q&A and people will have an opportunity to meet with others attending the event and bereavement organisations if they wish.
A very limited number of tickets are available. Register on Eventbrite here .
*Organisations represented on the night will include Anam Cara, Bumbleance, Féileacáin, FirstLight, HUGG, Irish Road Victims Association, Jack and Jill, LauraLynn, A Little Lifetime and the Irish Hospice Foundation.
For more info about the film: www.alovethatneverdiesfilm.com
Read more about the Good Grief Project here: www.thegoodgriefproject.co.uk
For our bereavement tools and resources, visit www.bereaved.ie

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This film will change the way the world see grief”
Scarlett Lewis, Mother of Sandy Hook Victim
“Tender and uplifting. Raw and real”     
Kathryn Mannix, author – With The End In Mind

2019 Workshops on Loss and Bereavement

Posted on: November 23rd, 2018

Bereavement training is central to The Irish Hospice Foundation’s bereavement programme.  We strive to provide accessible, high quality training for professionals, volunteers and others with an interest in learning more about bereavement.
Hosted by the Bereavement Education & Resource Centre at The Irish Hospice Foundation, our workshops focus on a range of topics associated with bereavement, including children and adolescents, suicide and addiction.
Every year roughly 400 people take part in our workshops. 
Workshops are suitable for people requiring basic up to intermediate level bereavement theory for professional or volunteer development.
Our presenters represent a wide range of bereavement care practitioners from the voluntary and statutory sectors.
For more information & how to book, click here.

CEOL Compassionate End of Life in Residential Care Centres – A Quality Improvement Approach

Posted on: November 23rd, 2017
Photographer - Paul Sherwood paul@sherwood.ie 087 230 9096

Irish Hospice Foundation CEOL ‘Compassionate End of Life’ programme launch

CEOL which stands for ‘Compassionate End of Life’ empowers all staff to provide the best possible end-of-life care for people living in residential care centres (RCC) in Ireland.

 

“All of us want assurance that the care our loved ones receive at end of life in residential care should be the best. The Irish Hospice Foundation (IHF) developed the Journey of Change programme to enable RCC (where 25% of people die each year) continually review and reflect the care they provide at end of life and introduce changes so that residents needs and their families are met in a truly holistic manner. We are very proud and grateful to the 100 RCC sites that participated in the first phase of the p rogram, and particularly those who engaged in the evaluation, which has informed the next phase CEOL” according to Marie Lynch, Head of Healthcare programmes, Irish Hospice Foundation.

 

This launch is the next step to introduce a national framework that will enable residential care centres keep a constant focused on providing compassion at end of life for residents, families and staff.

Partnership

The Irish Hospice Foundation is pleased to announce our partnership with Beechfield Care Group, and we are delighted that Sarah McMickan CEO of Beechfield Care Group will formally launch the CEOL programme.  We have agreed to work together to achieve the recognition amongst providers and policy makers that end-of-life care is a key component of quality care in nursing homes, and will be advocating for required investment to ensure this takes place.

 

“As CEO of Beechfield Care Group, I am very aware of how important it is for the residential care sector to continually seek improvements from the broadest perspective in the delivery of person centred care as residents approach the end of their life.  For this reason I am delighted to launch the Irish Hospice Foundation CEOL programme; it will be very helpful to the sector to have a formal framework to support the delivery of compassionate care at end of life. This will become increasingly important with the change in Ireland’s demographics, and more people dying in residential care settings,” said Ms Mickan.

 

In Ireland there are currently over 28,000 people living in residential care, with approximately 7,000 people dying each year in these settings. As highlighted by the latest ERSI report (Projections of demand for healthcare in Ireland, 2015-2030) the number of people living in nursing homes is projected to increase by between 40 to 54 per cent by 2030.

 

Providing compassionate care for residents approaching the end of their life is a fundamental component of person-centred care.  The CEOL Programme enables staff to continuously review, reflect and improve the end-of-life care they provide for residents, their families and the staff themselves. The programme embeds a continuous quality improvement approach and is built around the needs of the individual, with the resident always at the heart of every decision.  Good end-of-life care is about being supported to live well until you die.

Pilot

The pilot phase of the programme called ‘A Journey of Change’ ran from 2015 to 2016 in which over 100 RCC’s participated in. Dr Kathy Walsh (KW Research and Associates Ltd) conducted an independent evaluation of the Journey of Change programme and found that that it has the capacity to improve end-of-life care in participating residential care centres.  “Where all elements of the Programme have been implemented, there have been significant changes in practice in relation to End-of-Life Care (EOLC) planning, at time of death and after death, with staff less likely to want to transfer patients to hospital toward end of life.” (Dr Kathy Walsh, 2017).

 

The feedback from staff has been extremely positive, with staff reporting that their confidence and communication skills in relation to end-of-life care had improved as a result of their participation in the Programme. The Journey of Change Evaluation report also identified staff development in term of recognising and providing caring to a dying person, accessing specialist palliative care earlier, accessing GP services earlier, pain management and supporting the person to die in the care centre as per the wishes of the resident.

 

Staff from St Oliver Plunkett Community Hospital who have participated in the programme have reported ‘because we are more confident talking to our residents about death and end of life, we have a lot more conversations with them about what they want, like and dislike.  As a result, we know a lot more about what our residents want at end of life and we do our very best to give them what they want’.