Home Posts tagged "Sharon Foley"

Posts Tagged ‘Sharon Foley’

Rosabel’s Rooms- In partnership with the Irish Hospice Foundation

Posted on: March 8th, 2018

Rosabel’s Rooms was established by parents Suzanne McClean and Gary Monroe in memory of their beloved daughter Rosabel Monroe, who died suddenly and unexpectedly in April 2017, aged sixteen months.

Rosabel’s Rooms in collaboration with The Irish Hospice Foundation, was launched on the 5th January 2018, on what would have been Rosabel’s 2nd Birthday.
The project will develop the following three activities:
  1. Through the Design & Dignity Programme at the Irish Hospice Foundation, this project will facilitate the development of family-friendly bereavement suites in hospital emergency departments around Ireland, which will provide comfort and dignity for families following the loss of a loved one.
  1. Through our Room-to-Heal fund, this project will facilitate direct financial support to families, when a child dies in Ireland. This will help to accommodate taking time off work, paying for funeral costs etc.
  1. Over time this project will work to ensure required therapeutic supports are made available for individuals impacted by child loss.
Sharon Foley CEO of the IHF Said: “We hope this partnership with Rosabel’s Rooms will give sanctuary for families to be together in private at extremely difficult times in their lives and those caring for them in the hospital.  The essence of Design & Dignity projects is to convey a sense of reverence and respect for life, death and bereavement.”
For more information, email: rosabelsrooms@gmail.com or click here
For upcoming events, click here  To donate to Rosabel’s Rooms, click here
Design & Dignity is part of the Hospice Friendly Hospitals (HFH) Programme is an IHF initiative to ensure that palliative, end of life and bereavement care are central to the everyday business of hospitals.  To date, the Design and Dignity Project has supported 34 projects around Ireland enabling hospitals to create relaxing spacious family rooms, inpatient suites and maternity bereavement suites and upgraded mortuaries into welcoming, respectful environments. For more information, click here
CHY 6830 - Registered Charity 20013554

IHF welcomes Dáil Committee report calling for development of national end of life strategy

Posted on: July 15th, 2014

The Irish Hospice Foundation, (IHF), today welcomed the report from the Dail Committee on Health and Children calling for the development of a national strategy on palliative care, end of life and bereavement.


Chief Executive Officer of the IHF, Sharon Foley, said she hoped the government will act on the findings of the report and put palliative and end of life care at the top of health and other policy agendas. She commended the Dail Committee chairman, Jerry Buttimer TD, and members for the hearings saying “a great service” had been done for the country.


Ms Foley said on average 29,000 people die in Ireland each year and as many as 290,000 are left bereaved annually.  Using international research, there is an estimated €1.3 billion being spent on end of life care every year, but this spend is largely unplanned and uncoordinated.


“We passionately believe that much more can be done to support the health and social services to deliver better end of life care everywhere and this report is a major step in this direction.”


“It is the right of every person to die in comfort and dignity but this is something we must plan for. It is possible to secure high quality care for those facing death while also ensuring the very best use of resources. A national strategy on palliative care, end of life and bereavement, as recommended in todays report, will play a key role in ensuring this.”


Ms Foley said this strategy must be for the entire population – from those who need GP support to those who need special palliative care to manage their pain and other complex symptoms and to those left behind and facing grief. The strategy, she stressed, needs to be relevant to patients of all ages with all conditions including dementia.


“It also needs to be wider than healthcare. It needs to look at the economic, administrative and legal issues including the funeral industry and bereavement.”


Ms Foley also welcomed the committee recommendation that the Government address the regional disparities which exist in the provision and funding of specialist palliative care services in Ireland.


“As many as 2,500 patients have no access to in-patient hospice care in their area as they don’t exist. We have three regions in Ireland with no in patient hospice units – the north east, the midlands and the south east, as well as Kerry, Wicklow and Mayo.  Citizens are living and dying with an inequitable system. We have approximately 150 hospice beds today but we should have 450 and we also have significant deficits in hospice staff. “


Ms Foley said more need to be done to help people fulfil their wish to die at home. Figures show that while 67 per cent of us would prefer to die at home only 26 per cent of us will do so while another 25 per cent will die in long stay settings. “Lots of good work is being done through the IHF Primary Palliative Care programme, the Hospice home care teams and national hospice homecare for children programme.  In the latter, we we are funding 85% of the programme which is supporting families to care for children, with life limiting illness, at home.”


“This report, along with the recent report by the Ombudsman on end of life, will make a serious contribution to the national conversation on death and dying and bereavement and I warmly welcome it.”


Note: Link to Oireachtas Committee report on End of Life launched today http://www.oireachtas.ie/parliament/oireachtasbusiness/committees_list/health-and-children/reports/